Obesogen, what is that?

Scientists think there could be a connection between industrial chemical use and obesity. As the environment is contaminated with more and more industrial chemicals so have obesity rates increased. Perhaps there is a link: some chemicals might cause obesity. Such chemicals are called obesogens, and they are used to produce such mundane products as plastic bags or cosmetics. 

It is possible that obesogens could disturb our bodies’ endocrine system, and cause weight gain. They disrupt energy balance; they tell your body to store extra fat, or interfere with your appetite control system so you feel hungry when you shouldn’t.

Some common obesogens:

Fructose, consumed in large amounts fructose disturbs the appetite, leads to weight gain, fatty liver, and  insulin resistance.

Tributylin and atrazine, are found in tap water. Tributylin is an ingredient in paints, and atrazine is from pesticides used in industrial farming.

Bisphenol-A (BPA), a synthetic estrogen used to make plastics hard.  Often it is used in the liners of canned foods.

Phthalates are used to make plastics soft, in plastic wraps, vinyl, and even air fresheners.

What can you do?

Cut down on your sugar intake. Stop drinking sugary sodas, and reduce your intake of industrially produced pre-packaged foods.

Avoid industrially produced foods as much as you can. Buy local and organic from your farmer’s market. Don’t buy pre-packaged plastic wrapped foods in the supermarket.

The Environmental Working Group has lots of information on chemicals in our environments at http://www.ewg.org

David Millett Publications

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